(via lizzysmart)

todaysdocument:

Signatures and Pictographs

Representatives of the Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawatomi, and Wyandot tribes signed this treaty with the United States on November 17, 1807, ceding millions of acres in Ohio and Michigan. Each tribal representative signed with a pictograph. President Thomas Jefferson and Secretary of State James Madison signed at the bottom. The tribes received $10,000 collectively, $2,400 annually, and reservations of 1 to 6 square miles.

Treaty between the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot, and Potawatomi Indians, 11/17/1807

via DocsTeach

(November is Native American Heritage Month!)

(Source: research.archives.gov)

Via Fictional Interface.

Via Fictional Interface.

prostheticknowledge:

Homoglyphi.cc

A set of tools to transform typed text into familiar-looking unicode for stylistic or encryption purposes:

Homoglyphi.cc is a simple tool for writing Unicode-calligraphy. The user can combine characters from the Astral Planes of the code structure to create alternative word-images. These can, for exemple, be pasted into typographically restrictive social media. The point of view of homoglyphi.cc is the basic character set of cloud-english.

A homoglyph is a symbol that has a similar form to another symbol. The Unicode Standard is a utopian masterplan where each archetypical symbol is given its own space in an immense skeletal structure reaching for the sky. The FAQ says: “Unicode covers all the characters for all the writing systems of the world, modern and ancient.” At the time of writing, 110,182 symbols are encoded. Many of these are homoglyphs. This offers possibilities for creative users wishing to embellish their writing.

There are two online tools which (both illustrated in the GIFs above) one is an automatic converter of text, the other a custom character-by-character editor. Both can be used here

As well as these, there is now a Chrome extension available, allowing you to automatically covert text typed anywhere online - this works in Google, Facebook, Twitter … even Tumblr. The Chrome extension is available here

hungryghoast:

archatlas:

Fake Skyline Alex Hofford

Tourists visiting Hong Kong during hazy days can now take a picture of the skyline with the help of banner photographs of the skyline during a sunny day. Does that make sense? Guess it does by the amount of tourists using the backdrop photographs! Be sure not to let the seam show…

simulacra simulacrum sim city

(via otto-obrien-deactivated20140822)

installator:

"Ronald Bladen watching the installation of his sculpture Black Triangle, 1969 / John A. Ferrari, photographer. Fischbach Gallery records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.”

installator:

"Ronald Bladen watching the installation of his sculpture Black Triangle, 1969 / John A. Ferrari, photographer. Fischbach Gallery records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.”

"Pizza Dot Net"

Amazon’s spam problems are well documented. The Kindle store is awash in books confusingly similar to bestsellers. Companies like Icon Group International offer highly specific books like The 2013 Import and Export Market for Sawn, Chipped, Sliced, or Peeled Non-Coniferous Wood over 6 Millimeters Thick in New Zealand. Icon’s books are created by a patented system. The system’s creator Philip M. Parker says he’s planning to go after romance novels next.

When heralding the age of mass customization and the rise of rapid prototyping it is easy to get enthusiastic. Even when talking about what could go wrong, people typically stop at “but a lot of amateurs will generate bad early attempts”. Talk about crapjects and strange shaper subcultures still gives the whole threat a kind of artisanal feel. The true scale of object spam will be much greater.

Yes, lowered barriers to entry mean more small scale making and writing. Yes, domestic rapid fabrication and print on demand services open the floodgates to amateur designers and authors. They open the floodgates to algorithms too.

-Algorithmic Rape Jokes in the Library of Babel

via The New Inquiry

this

(Source: printedinternet)

For DIY Web archiving without having to deal with Heritrix: 
Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL) is a graphical user interface (GUI) atop multiple web archiving tools intended to be used as an easy way for anyone to preserve and replay web pages.
Tools included and accessible through the GUI are Heritrix 3.1.0, Wayback 1.6, and warc-proxy. Support packages include Apache Tomcat, phantomjs and pyinstaller.
WAIL is written mostly in Python and a small amount of JavaScript.
The files are saved on your local computer and can be backed up that way. A very useful tool from Mat Kelly, particularly for personal digital archiving. Archive your blog and your loved ones’ blogs and your internet crush’s blogs today!

For DIY Web archiving without having to deal with Heritrix: 

Web Archiving Integration Layer (WAIL) is a graphical user interface (GUI) atop multiple web archiving tools intended to be used as an easy way for anyone to preserve and replay web pages.

Tools included and accessible through the GUI are Heritrix 3.1.0Wayback 1.6, and warc-proxy. Support packages include Apache Tomcatphantomjs and pyinstaller.

WAIL is written mostly in Python and a small amount of JavaScript.


The files are saved on your local computer and can be backed up that way. A very useful tool from Mat Kelly, particularly for personal digital archiving. Archive your blog and your loved ones’ blogs and your internet crush’s blogs today!

To see:
Art in General, in collaboration with The Center for Fiction, New York, presents Stockholm-based artist Meriç Algün Ringborg’s New Commissions project, The Library of Unborrowed Books.
The project, presenting hundreds of books that have never been borrowed from the Center for Fiction’s library, calls into question what subjects in any contemporary moment have ‘currency’ or desirability, and brings attention to topics and stories that have been temporarily overlooked but that could have their relevance restored in the future.

To see:

Art in General, in collaboration with The Center for Fiction, New York, presents Stockholm-based artist Meriç Algün Ringborg’s New Commissions project, The Library of Unborrowed Books.

The project, presenting hundreds of books that have never been borrowed from the Center for Fiction’s library, calls into question what subjects in any contemporary moment have ‘currency’ or desirability, and brings attention to topics and stories that have been temporarily overlooked but that could have their relevance restored in the future.